A Definitive Guide to Mastering the Four Faces of the Procurement Specialist 

A Definitive Guide3 (1).png
 

The role of procurement is rapidly evolving from vendor gatekeepers to strategic facilitators. The modern procurement specialist must be an expert on multiple fronts—serving internal customers, collaborating with external suppliers, managing data, and devising company solutions.

Peter Smith of Spend Matters identified four faces of a procurement specialist:

  • The Diplomat:  pragmatic and focused, with strong negotiation skills, subtlety, and sophistication

  • The Analyst:  forms actionable insights from external information sources; translates news and data into a competitive advantage for their organizations

  • The Investigator: focuses on internal information and data analysis; capable of harnessing technology to understand, manipulate, and filter the data

  • The Leader:  motivates, influences, and persuades both colleagues and key stakeholders in their organizations

Smith predicted that by 2020, procurement specialists will need to be fluent in each of these four faces; indeed, we can already see the growing need for procurement specialists to excel in these diverse roles.

The TAMR Study of Top Metrics for Measuring Procurement Performance reported that reducing purchasing costs has dropped by 52% as a priority of purchasing executives. Meanwhile, organizations with a world class procurement function spend 20% less while generating more than double the cost savings of typical procurement
organizations.

How then does a procurement specialist reach this higher echelon of performance in a time of myriad expectations and priorities? We've gathered some 100% free resources to offer guidance, answer questions, and help you develop all the skills you need to succeed in a four-faced procurement profession.
 

Introducing A Definitive Guide to Mastering the Four Faces of the Procurement Specialist.
 

Below, we've outlined the best practices, implementation factors, and go-to reference sources for a procurement specialist to contribute greater value and win in their organization. 

And, we'll be adding updates as more resources are submitted, so be sure to join our community to get the scoop on how to excel in procurement!

The best way to use this guide is to do a high level review, first. We made this easy for you by providing descriptions for each section and chapter, key takeaways for each article, and our favorite quotes. 

Then, you can just read the articles that speak to you the most. You don't have to go through everything in one sitting. This is more of a resource you can refer to and digest over time. No matter when you come back to this, you're sure to get something of value. 

Procurement isn't easy—and, with so many changes in business, technology, and society, it pays to be prepared and on top of your game. By mastering these four critical roles of the procurement profession, you'll enhance your ability to be a top performer and an impactful player in your organization. You'll set yourself up to be seen as far more than just the 'Price Person,' but more of a strategic, innovative contributor.

Are you ready to level up your expertise?
 

Click the link to jump to the corresponding chapter.



Part I: The Diplomat

While operating in a global environment the procurement specialist must be practical and determined. Building relationships through direct personal contact, the diplomat aspect exhibits toughness as well as charm in navigating the world of the global supply chain.

CHAPTER 1: GROW HIGHLY RESPONSIVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH YOUR SUPPLIERS

Long term, strategic relationships with suppliers is key to successful negotiations. Every interaction you have with suppliers colors the future of your relationship with them, so it’s incredibly important to build your supplier relationships right.
 

  • Strategy Guide: Supplier Relationship Management | Procurement Leaders

    Key Takeaway:
    Working effectively with suppliers means being able to apply the best strategy for the appropriate type of supplier. This requires having a high level view of your company needs, in addition to evaluating the maturity of the supplier. 

    Best Quote:
    As the knowledge economy grows many organisations are realising the dependencies they share with each other and that significant impact can only be achieved by working together in planned and managed ways."
     
  • The True Cost of Delayed Supplier Payments | Nancy Clinton {Spend Matters}

    Key Takeaway:
    Extending payment terms harms your chance of being a customer of choice for the supplier. You'll actually end up losing money in the long-run, and you'll forfeit many benefits you could have received from a strong relationship.

    Best Quote:
    And if [organizations] are considered a customer of choice by these suppliers they are twice as likely to receive other benefits such as access to the supplier’s A team, access to scarce resource in times of need and preferential pricing. ”
     
  • Tips to Communicate Effectively with Chinese Suppliers | Renaud Anjoran {Quality Inspection.org}

    Key Takeaway:
    You want to maintain good quality control even with suppliers you trust. Keep this an ongoing process. 

    Best Quote:
    “ 'I can’t' is not in their vocabulary, so be wary if you get silence for an answer”
     
  • Effective Communication: The Client-Vendor Dilemma | Inside ARM

    Key Takeaway:
    Don't assume communication with your supplier is clear, especially if it seems like an expectation isn't being met. Despite contracts, there can still be misunderstandings. Take time to have solid two-way communication and check for understanding.

    Best Quote:
    “The primary goal in an effective partnership is to maintain ongoing contact, while focusing on ways to clarify and confirm expectations.”
     
  • Manage Your Suppliers | Info Entrepreneurs

    Key Takeaway:
    Develop forecasting, scheduling, and planning strategies in collaboration with your suppliers. Keeping them in the loop will give you more accuracy. 

    Best Quote:
    Update [key suppliers] on strategic changes or new products early on - this helps them adapt to meet those changes.”
     
  • Customer of Choice and Supplier Innovation | Alan Day {State of Flux}

    Key Takeaway:
    If you want to encourage supplier innovations, make sure to have an engaged process around them so that the suppliers get timely feedback and their ideas are taken seriously. 

    Best Quote:
    "SRM leaders not only have the most developed programmes, but they are also receiving much higher benefits; both in terms of hard financial (some in excess of 8%) as well as customer of choice benefits."
     
  • It's About the Supplier Experience | Alan Day {State of Flux}

    Key Takeaway:
    Get comprehensive feedback on the supplier's perception of their relationship with your company, and have a clear discussion on what each party wants out of the relationship and how they wish to be treated. 

    Best Quote:
    "Putting this ‘golden rule’ into a supplier relationship context, the concept describes behaving in a way that acknowledges relationships need to be two way, have an element of reciprocity and, over time, deliver the requirements of both parties if the partnership is to be sustainable."
     
  • Case Study: The New, Improved Keiretsu | Katsuki AokiThomas Taro Lennerfors {Harvard Business Review}

    Key Takeaway:
    If you want to develop stronger supplier relationships, involve them more in your company and be willing to actively help them improve. Going out of your way for them will encourage them to go out of their way for you.

    Best Quote:
    “Few manufacturers have been as open to suppliers’ ideas or as successful in incorporating them as Toyota. It expects systems suppliers to help improve product design by, for example, figuring out how to incorporate lighter materials without sacrificing strength.”

CHAPTER 2: USE NEXT LEVEL NEGOTIATION TO AMPLIFY SAVINGS

Negotiation doesn’t have to be an uphill battle about price reduction. On the contrary, the best procurement professionals see negotiation as an opportunity to increase their benefit and to upgrade their relationship with their supplier.

  • Best Practices for Negotiating with Key Suppliers | Jonathan Hughes and Mark Gordon {Vantage Partners}

    Key Takeaway:
    By being upfront with suppliers about why you want something, and supporting open dialogue, you help enable more collaborative negotiation solutions that bring you both greater value.

    Best Quote:
    By negotiating collaboratively and working to develop joint-gain solutions, companies are able to avoid haggling, posturing, and other time-wasting games that impede the process of reaching an agreement.”
     
  • Checklist–Negotiations | New Zealand Government

    Key Takeaway:
    Before going into a negotiation, understand the value you place on the different elements relevant to the negotiation—that way, you know ahead of time what you're likely to concede on. 

    Best Quote:
    “Early in the negotiation, test your understanding by asking questions. Fill information gaps. Check assumptions.”
     
  • Procurement: Five Ways to Maximise Communication | Graham Oakes {Econsultancy}

    Key Takeaway:
    Followup with the supplier and make sure they understand your brief, and the factors that underpin it. Offer a chance for dialogue.

    Best Quote:
    “I accept that objectivity is tricky, there will always [be] biases in our perceptions, cognitive weaknesses affecting the way we think. So I don’t focus on it. Instead, I focus on maximising communication.
     
  • Procurement Negotiation Checklist: Preparation as a Winning Strategy | Hillary Ohlmann {Deltabid}

    Key Takeaway:
    Imagine you're the supplier—what would you want out of the negotiation? Research the company well enough to get an idea for what they might value. 

    Best Quote:
    Keep in mind that unit cost is not always the most important factor to negotiate. If you cannot get the price down, try to obtain more value for the same price (delivery terms, smaller order batches, longer payment terms, shorter delivery time, etc.).”
     
  • 3 Tips for Communicating Effectively with Your Suppliers | Traci Slowinski {ETQ}

    Key Takeaway:
    Have a clear agenda. You don't want to waste time for either party, so having a structure is valuable. 

    Best Quote:
    Have a clear understanding of what the situation is with all the relevant details, have a recommendation or two ready to share, set the expectation of when a response is required and what the immediate actions need to be.”
     
  • 6 Steps to More Effective Supplier Negotiations | Bridget McCrea {Digi-Key Electronics}

    Key Takeaway:
    Renegotiate your contract every year. If you conduct a regular assessment to see how much you pay a supplier and what the market rate is, you'll have more leverage in your negotiation.

    Best Quote:
    “Even if you’ve been procuring the same part from the same vendor successfully for the last 10 years, that doesn’t mean there isn’t some room for explorative thinking.”
     
  • The Myth Of Win Win Negotiations in Purchasing | Artin Vaqari {Purchasing & Procurement Center}

    Key Takeaway:
    Thinking of just the "price pie" is limiting. You're going to end up in a win/lose scenario with your supplier, and that will breed resentment, which you will end up paying for. Think of other things that could add value to the deal, for both parties.

    Best Quote:
    “When you can achieve all of your biggest TCO objectives and still have the vendor feel good about it, instead of being bitter, then you can say that you've arrived as a Procurement Professional.”
     
  • Talking to Vendors: 10 Quick Tips for Getting it Right | Jessica Lawrence {Turbine}

    Key Takeaway:
    Be open about the topic of money, such as when and how you pay bills. It's best to get this out of the way early. 

    Best Quote:
    “To do your job well, you need accurate information, so don’t pressure your vendors to make something up on the spot.”

     

Part II: The Analyst

The world is now ultra connected and overloaded with data to analyze, understand, and effectively use. Those who become skilled using this data to identify opportunities will be the ultimate beneficiaries.

CHAPTER 3: GAIN BETTER QUALITY INFORMATION FROM YOUR SUPPLIER EVALUATIONS

A supplier or vendor can be a long-term partner, not only offering your company what it needs, but also being a potential ally in innovation and market adaptation; it stands to reason you would want the best supplier for the job. Here are some excellent ways to ensure a supplier is a right fit for your company, and to evaluate that relationship over time.

  • 10 Cs of Supplier Evaluation | Mind Tools

    Key Takeaway:
    Your supplier's workplace culture is on of many important factors to consider. Companies with similar cultures work best together.

    Best Quote:
    Mismatches between your needs and a supplier's offerings can add costs, cause delays, and even damage your organization's reputation.”
     
  • A 19-Point Supply Risk Checklist | Charles Dominick {Next Level Purchasing

    Key Takeaway:
    What's the probability of a natural disaster occurring in your supplier's region? Consider variables such as fault lines, hurricane belts, and flood plains.

    Best Quote:
    Supply risk comes in many forms. You can mitigate one type of supply risk but be victimized by another.”
     
  • What to Consider When Evaluating Vendors | Imelda Tan {Practically Tech}

    Key Takeaway:
    Make sure your requirements convey your solution selection criteria; when suppliers propose their solutions, you can ask how they will specifically meet all aspects of the requirements, enabling you to make the best choice of supplier.

    Best Quote:
    If you want the vendors to remain interested in your business after you commit to purchase the scope of work at the quoted price, do remember to assure them you are just as committed to pay more for any necessary changes in the interests of your business, or to accommodate a longer schedule, or to do both.”
     
  • How To Evaluate Your Vendors For Business Continuity Risk | John Beattie {SungardAS}

    Key Takeaway:
    In evaluating suppliers, ask questions that are probing and specific, rather than just asking about which plans and assessments they have and are prepared to do. When you get more specific, you can tell how much thought they've actually put into proactive strategies and how well they're likely to implement them.

    Best Quote:
    “What happens is this: businesses are asking their vendors general ‘checklist’ queries. They are not asking questions that relate directly to the specific products and services the vendor provides for them.”
     
  • 5 Ways to Evaluate a Supplier | Libby Bierman {My Purchasing Center}

    Key Takeaway:
    Compare the supplier's financial ratios with the averages of other suppliers in the industry. This gives you a better idea of their standing than just a basic audit. 

    Best Quote:
    If a company is not profitable, it likely will not stay in business for long. This becomes your problem when you suddenly have to find a new supplier with similar quality goods and immediate capacity.”
     
  • The Value of a Systematic Approach to Supplier Evaluation | Pontus Stjernfeldt {LinkedIn}

    Key Takeaway:
    Rather than just look at the history and current position of the supplier, calculate their potential position in the future. It will give you far greater perspective.

    Best Quote:
    “This common evaluation also serves as basis for creating an overall map of your entire supplier portfolio and what you want to address.”
     
  • How to Evaluate Suppliers | Assembly

    Key Takeaway:
    To have a more strategic approach, it's useful to group your suppliers based on how much of a partner they are, how much work needs to go into them, and how much of a risk they are. 

    Best Quote:
    “The lowest total cost of a product includes not only its initial procurement cost, but all those factors that went into getting it to market and keeping it there. Therefore, you must take into consideration these added factors.”

CHAPTER 4: PREDICT WITH GREATER CONFIDENCE TO HELP YOUR ORGANIZATION ADAPT

In a marketplace that is changing rapidly, it pays to be highly attuned to the fluctuations and to adapt as needed. Being in procurement, you likely have a strong analytical ability already—this information will help you leverage that to be a forecasting force in your organization, helping it move gracefully forward and to reap the rewards. Your team will appreciate you all the more for it.

  • Price Forecasting: Who Needs That? | Paulo Moretti {My Purchasing Center}

    Key Takeaway:
    If you want to have more accurate long-term forecasts, put together data from several drivers and variables, including GDP and inflation.

    Best Quote:
    Those criticisms of inaccuracy with weather forecasting most certainly apply to our earlier topic of price forecasting. However, for the savvy user, price forecasting can be an invaluable weapon in the Purchasing arsenal.”
     
  • 4 Steps of Predictive Analytics in Procurement | Dr. Jörg Dittrich {Orpheus}

    Key Takeaway:
    For an ideal statistical analysis, it's best to identify errors and outliers in data ahead of time.

    Best Quote:
    Valid price analysis can only be conducted after guaranteeing that the data quality is sufficient”
     
  • 5 Tips for Better Demand Planning and Forecasting | Dave Blanchard {IndustryWeek}

    Key Takeaway: 
    Your forecasting approach should be tailored to your company and your unique needs. The more you understand these needs, the more suitable your method will be. 

    Best Quote:
    “The only guarantee in forecasting is that everything will not go exactly as planned. This is why having defined alternatives or backup plans (or what UPS likes to call a demand-responsive and flexible supply chain) is crucial.”
     
  • Supply Planning Improvement: A Causal Forecasting Approach | Adnan Mukattash and Murad Samhouri {Science Alert}

    Key Takeaway: 
    Use casual methodology to build supply planning by modeling the effects between finished goods and raw materials and building a forecasting model and eventually a procurement plan.

    Best Quote:
    “One of the most popular and reliable methods to forecast raw materials and develop a proper procurement plan is by forecasting the demand for the finished goods using the Bill of Material (BOM) of the finished goods…”
     
  • 5 Tips for Forecasting to Strategic Sourcing | cpsmtraining {YouTube}

    Key Takeaway: 
    Economic indicators, such as job growth, are important elements to consider in a forecast.

    Best Quote:
    "Forecasting is the basis of strategic sourcing."
     
  • Demand Forecasting and Techniques | 3gvideo {YouTube}

    Key Takeaway: 
    Explore various qualitative and quantitative forecasting techniques and learn which is best suited for your situation based on your objectives and the data available.

    Best Quote:
    “Forecasts are vital to every business organization and to every management decision.”

     

Part III: The Investigator

You must know what your data means while drawing conclusions and developing actions based on understanding that data. Then identify and exploit meanings drawn from the datasets, and subsequent interrogation, using powerful “what if…” questions. Here, the Investigator discovers value opportunities, such as useful areas for the aggregation of spending, compliance issues, and usage trends dictating changes in stockholding or cost management.

CHAPTER 5: PUT YOUR SPEND ANALYSIS ON STEROIDS

It’s crucial to have a clear, high level view of spending. By implementing a spend map, and other spend analytics strategies, you can be more empowered in making strategic decisions that will be sure to impress.

  • Analysing the Procurement Portfolio and Developing a Procurement Profile | UN Procurement Practitioner’s Handbook

    Key Takeaway: 
    By graphing the supply risk and relative expenditures, you'll categorize your procurement portfolio into one of four options and see proposed possible strategies based on this categorization.  

    Best Quote:
    “Analysing procurement spend provides data that can be used as a baseline to measure improvements, but also to provide reliable data for deciding strategies to realize short and long term savings.”
     
  • Top 10 Tips for More Valuable Spend Intelligence (And More Cost Savings Potential) | David Bush {eSourcing Forum}

    Key Takeaway: 
    Get a quick tip or two for making practical improvements to your spend management.

    Best Quote:
    “There are many ways you can put together a project to gain valuable information and act upon it, one step at a time. Whether it be starting with a services-based approach, or acquiring the many available software tools on the market to have a comprehensive solution, the savings and ROI are dramatic with Spend Analysis and Strategic Sourcing projects.”
     
  • Spend Analysis | Principles and Practices of Public Procurement

    Key Takeaway: 
    Breakdown the process of collecting, cleansing, automating and analyzing spend data - especially for public procurement organizations.

    Best Quote:
    “Procurement organizations should use spend analysis to leverage buying power, reduce costs, provide better management and oversight of suppliers, and to develop an informed procurement strategy.”
     
  • How to Conduct a Spend Analysis: Methodology in Detail |  Abe Chaves {aPriori}

    Key Takeaway: 
    Get your data together and identify areas for potential savings. Then make a plan to tackle them.

    Best Quote:
    “When beginning a spend analysis, the first step is to scope your spend so that you can narrow down the thousands of parts that you buy to a manageable few.”
     
  • Five Things: Getting The Basics Right In Procurement | Ernst & Young

    Key Takeaway: 
    Use spend mapping to drive sustainable savings and ensure procurement is integrated with your organization as a whole.

    Best Quote:
    “A spendmap can provide you with the basis for identifying opportunities and risks, providing the foundation for cost reduction initiatives and improving the value you receive from your suppliers.”
     
  • Spend Analytics Part 1 - The Evolution of Spend Analysis | Chainlink Research (check out all 5 parts)

    Key Takeaway: 
    Starting with the evolution of spend analysis, understand how to use spend analysis to review suppliers, analyze sales and help your engineers.

    Best Quote:
    “What a company can accomplish in their spend analysis efforts is constrained by the quality and completeness of the data available to them. A spend project can uncover data shortcomings that were previously swept under the rug.”
     
  • Working with Your Users is Key (to Spend Management Success): Part I, Part II, and Part III | Bernard Gunther {Sourcing Innovation}

    Key Takeaway: 
    Done correctly, getting people involved in the design of your spend analysis system can be very helpful. For an even better system, set a commodity structure and keep things fluid and useful.

    Best Quote:
    "Rather than thinking of working with users as a burden, think of it as an opportunity to engage and educate your users and refine the work process."
     
  • 12 Things You Can Do With Spend Analysis Data | Mike Harrison {Spikes Cavell}

    Key Takeaway: 
    Get some inspiration on how to use your spend analysis data from procuring co-operatively to ensuring legal compliance.

    Best Quote:
    “Once you have taken the time to complete a full spend analysis exercise that brings together your Accounts Payable, PCard and Purchase Order data, the next step is to start looking at what you can do with all that information.”
     
  • How to Do Spend Analysis Video Presentation | Robi Bendorf {Purchasing and Procurement Center}

    Key Takeaway: 
    This video will help you conduct an ABC analysis to develop a spend profile.

    Best Quote:
    "The video...shows how to do spend analysis for your suppliers, which results in A, B & C category classification of your suppliers."
     
  • There’s Still No Spend Analysis Without the Slice ‘N’ Dice | Eric Strovink {Sourcing Innovation}

    Key Takeaway: 
    This article will help you identify what to look out for in a spend analysis system and where most systems fail. (Check out the 11 parts at the bottom of the article)  to get an in depth look at how to evolve your spend analysis game and why to do so.

    Best Quote:

    "A flexible and powerful spend analysis system can make a huge psychological
    difference to an organization. It changes the analysis playing field
    from 'we just can’t afford to look into this' to 'of course we should
    look into this!'"

CHAPTER 6: REVEAL YOUR TOTAL VALUE OF OWNERSHIP AND DRIVE NEW SAVINGS

To go one step beyond evaluating your spend metrics, you'll need to hone your ability to measure non-price savings. This includes having a toolbox for investigating Total Cost of Ownership.

  • The Best Procurement Decisions Are Based on the Total Cost of Ownership | David Copenhaver {RESCO}

    Key Takeaway: 
    See the six costs to consider when applying TCO to material purchases and check out a strategy to reduce each one.

    Best Quote:
    “Whatever the systems adopted or tools employed, the only way to significantly reduce ownership costs and lower TCO is to develop partners in your supply chain.”
     
  • Total Cost of Ownership: An Introduction to Whole-of-Life Costing | New Zealand Government

    Key Takeaway: 
    Break down TCO and explore the two most commonly used TCO models. Finish up by calculating TCO and identifying some other factors to consider.

    Best Quote:
    “The initial purchase price is usually just the ’tip of the iceberg’ in terms of the costs you will incur. There are hidden costs lurking under the water line. You need to look beyond purchase price to identify all other expenses and income over the whole-of-life of the goods or service.”
     
  • Getting What You Pay For?—The Total Cost of Ownership Model | Sandra Barkman and Bryon S. Marks {International Supply Management Conference}

    Key Takeaway:
    Identify the five TCO cost variables and the seven areas of waste.

    Best Quote:
    “Today, the Supply professional has evolved from a reactive and/or transactional function to managing a strategic supply chain. The focus for sourcing decisions broadened based on elements of Total Cost of Ownership.”
     
  • Total Cost of Ownership; The Single Most Important Principle in Supply Chain Management | Robert Menard {Purchasing and Negotiation Training}

    Key Takeaway: 
    Learn the QSDP acronym and how it determines TCO to better measure it.

    Best Quote:
    “The principle of TCO has impacted commercial negotiations by expanding the narrow confines of Price to a vast field of opportunities for attaining Win-Win results.”
     
  • How to evaluate the Total Cost of Ownership | NIGP (may take a moment to translate automatically)

    Key Takeaway:
    Learn the value of TCO in the evolving role of procurement and how to integrate TCO into your procurement process.

    Best Quote:
    “By developing a simple scorecard to assess purchasing prices and practices, an agency can easily shed light on some TCO areas, especially if that information is already available within the agency.”
     
  • Total Cost of Ownership | Marty Schmidt {Business Case Analysis}

    Key Takeaway:
    This article can be used as a valuable resource for understanding TCO as well as tying it in with other parts of your process—such as cash flow estimates.

    Best Quote:
    “Asset ownership brings purchase costs, of course, but ownership also brings costs due to installing, deploying, using, upgrading, and maintaining the same assets.”
     
  • Segment your suppliers to reduce risk | Michael Giguere and Glen Goldbach {Supply Chain Quarterly}

    Key Takeaway:
    Place suppliers into three categories and learn about the TCO advantages of supplier segmentation.

    Best Quote:
    "It is feasible for companies to begin rethinking costs to include supply chain considerations"

     

Part IV: The Leader

Being a leader requires a range of skills to be called upon at any time including active listening, empathy, persuasion, independence, charisma, discernment, and presentation skills.

In succeeding in this face, procurement is seen as an intrinsic part of the organization as a whole with a vital role to play, not standing outside the core business merely as a support function. 

CHAPTER 7: TURN YOUR STAKEHOLDERS INTO YOUR BIGGEST SUPPORTERS

As a procurement professional, you bring a lot of value to your organization in many different ways – but chances are, you’re not getting credit for all the value you’re bringing. These posts will help you articulate your real value.

  • How to Measure Cost Savings | Martin Putters {Capgemeni Consulting}

    Key Takeaway:
    Examine this article to get the meat of what cost saving measures is all about, and how to implement them to gain trust of management. 

    Best Quote:
    “A correct, complete report which gives a clear insight into the performance of the procurement function will enhance the esteem and trust of the management.”
     
  • Five Ways Procurement Can Work Better with Internal Stakeholders | Jamie Eaton {Comensura}

    Key Takeaway:
    Learn and implement effective ways to bring internal stakenholders into the loop, gather information, enable feedback, and create more wins.

    Best Quote:
    “Being personal in your approach to identify and support your various stakeholders is crucial for procurement.”
     
  • Procurement Capabilities in CSR: Stakeholder Based Sustainability | Dave Henshall {CPP Purchasing Practice}

    Key Takeaway:
    Assess how procurement can make CSR a competitive weapon in your organisation's success

    Best Quote:
    Given that today, companies source between 40 – 80% of their needs externally with suppliers, they represent the most significant source of CSR risk to most organisations.”
     
  • How to Increase ROI With Clear Communication to Business Stakeholders—Procurement News | Procurious

    Key Takeaway:
    Learn to not leave money on the table in your organization's procurement efforts by building a procurement brand to enable highly effective internal stakeholder communications.

    Best Quote:
    “As much as a 2.5X ROI can be achieved from elevating the role of procurement, and aligning the goals and expectations of procurement teams to that of the business.”
     
  • 5 Steps to Communicating the Value of Procurement | Mike Harrison {Spikes Cavell}

    Key Takeaway:
    Use this webinar to put your procurement department in the best light possible, organization wide.

    Best Quote:
    “At the end of this session, a roadmap is provided for you to take away and plan your own recording and reporting of the value of Procurement.”
     
  • Five Steps to Communicating Your Spend Management Initiative Successfully | Jim Heininger

    Key Takeaway:
    Include these initiatives to create strategic, persuasive communications behind new spend management programs to ensure their success

    Best Quote:
    “Before all the compelling facts and hard evidence can convince employees to believe in your new procurement approach they must accept the change emotionally.”
     
  • Decide How to Engage with Stakeholders | New Zealand Government

    Key Takeaway:
    Identify different categories of stakeholders through the use of RASCI categories to understand who should be involved, who is impacted, identify issues and provide opportunities to learn

    Best Quote:
    “To develop a framework for managing different types of stakeholder relationships, map the power and influence of relevant stakeholders against their interest and aspirations.”

CHAPTER 8: EXPLODE YOUR CREDIBILITY WITH AN ALIGNED VISION

he first step in elevating procurement’s role in your organization is to develop procurement goals that align with your company’s vision and to make a plan to reach those goals. A well thought procurement plan that aligns with your company’s goals can be the difference between being vital and being a simple support function.

  • Six Steps to Align Supply Chain with Corporate Strategy |  via IndustryWeek.com Jeff Wallingford {Riverwood Solutions}

    Key Takeaway:
    Solidify the direction and principles of your department with these alignment steps to ensure everyone is on the same page in your organization concerning procurement.

    Best Quote:
    “One of the biggest failure points in aligning strategy is when the supply chain organization doesn't know what to align with.”
     
  • Top 5 Tips—The Importance of a Procurement Vision | The Source

    Key Takeaway:
    As a procurement specialist leader, vision is crucial. Create commitment with a fully engaged and motivated team using these tips.

    Best Quote:
    “Your vision should be pitched to your team in the sweet spot between being achievable and yet still representing a drastic leap from the starting point.”
     
  • Got Vision?—Taking Procurement to the Next Level | Jason Busch {Spend Matters}

    Key Takeaway:
    Add to your procurement vision, taking it to the next level in order to capture the hearts and minds of procurement professionals, employees, and suppliers.

    Best Quote:
    “Visions generate energy and enthusiasm. Procurement managers at any level can do the same thing in their realm of influence; whether they manage an organization, spend category, process, or project.”
     
  • Strategic Planning in Purchasing and Supply Management: An Epoch in a VUCA World | Thomas L. Tanel {My Purchasing Center}

    Key Takeaway:
    Lead your team to a higher effectiveness by benchmarking where your organization is among the three purchasing and supply management core focuses: transactional, tactical, and strategic purchasing using this article.

    Best Quote:
    “Business strategy is a road map telling us: 'how the business plans to be successful.' But the best strategy does not guarantee success.”    
     
  • Aligning Procurement Strategies to Business Goals: Part I , Part II | Torey Guingrich {Sourcing Innovation}

    Key Takeaway:
    Use these classifications as a starting point for your procurement department to use and begin looking at categories and sourcing strategies in a more deliberate manner

    Best Quote:
    “Scarce goods or services have rigid supply curves; there are limitations that prevent supply from meeting demand by simply increasing production/output.”
     
  • Analysing the Organization’s Procurement Function and Capability | Interagency Procurement Working Group

    Key Takeaway:
    Incorporate the questions in this handbook to create insight into your procurement process and uncover potential weaknesses.

    Best Quote:
    “To complete the analysis it is also necessary to look at the procurement function and capability in parallel to the analysis of the procurement portfolio.”
     
  • Strategic Procurement Planning—Procurement Guidance for Public Entities | Controller and Auditor-General, New Zealand

    Key Takeaway:
    Implement the 4 Quadrants method along with steps in this procurement guide, especially the guidance sections.

    Best Quote:
    “Individual procurement plans should usually be considered for higher value and higher risk procurement.”
     
  • Case study: A Guide to the Development of Procurement Strategies for the Scottish College Sector | Andrew Haddon, Marlene Anderson, Tracy Elliott, Douglas Bell {Scotland’s Colleges}

    Key Takeaway:
    Leverage this case study and it's details to enhance your procurement process and reinforce the impact that the procurement department has organization-wide.

    Best Quote:
    “A continued emphasis on procurement reform will be central to maximising savings and benefits, as well as recognition of the importance of procurement as a key strategic enabler of service design and service delivery.”

     

In Conclusion

As you can see above, there are many resources to help master these 4 faces of the procurement specialist. Whether the situation calls for more of a leader, analyst, diplomat or investigator approach, each has specific qualities that are powerful to the procurement professional. 

Implement this guide, use the resources cited and let us know what other impactful sources of knowledge you find and implement in your organizations.

Thank you for reading, we hope you've gained massive value from our content. Please share with others if you have and keep reading to take advantage of more valuable insights.